Updates

Stopping BP's toxic dumping scheme.

In 2007, BP announced plans to increase its dumping of toxic chemicals into Lake Michigan by hundreds of pounds a day. But through our advocacy and organizing, we helped gather 80,000 petition signatures and forced BP to back down. Environment Michigan has since helped win numerous victories for Lake Michigan, including cleaning up mercury and other industrial toxins.

Report | Environment America

Our Great Waters

To restore and protect our great waters, Environment Michigan is calling on Congress to pass legislation this summer that will reduce pollution, increase investments in restoration efforts, and protect our most treasured places for generations to come. This report highlights the following eight waters across the country that are in the most need of increased protections and immediate restoration efforts: Long Island Sound, Chesapeake Bay, the Gulf of Mexico, Lake Tahoe, the Puget Sound, the Columbia River, the San Francisco Bay and the Great Lakes.

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Report | Environment America Research & Policy Center

Corporate Agribusiness & America's Waterways

Pollution from agribusiness is responsible for some of America’s most intractable water quality problems – including the “dead zones” in the Chesapeake Bay, Gulf of Mexico and Lake Erie, and the pollution of countless streams and lakes with nutrients, bacteria, sediment and pesticides.

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Report | Environment Michigan Research & Policy Center

Growing Influence: The Political Power of Agribusiness and the Fouling of America's Waterways

The agribusiness lobby is well known as one of the most powerful in Washington, D.C., and many states. Less well known is the fact that big agribusiness interests are among the largest roadblocks to cleaner water for the American people.

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Report | Environment Michigan Research & Policy Center

Smart, Clean, and Ready to Go

Solar water heating has the potential to reduce America’s dependence on fossil fuels and curb pollution that causes global warming and respiratory problems. By taking advantage of America’s full potential to produce hot water for homes and businesses from solar energy, the nation could reduce natural gas consumption by 2.5 percent and electricity use by nearly one percent, while avoiding 52 million metric tons of carbon dioxide pollution per year—equivalent to emissions from 13 coal-fired power plants or 9.9 million cars.

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Report | Environment Michigan Research & Policy Center

Dirty Energy's Assault On Our Healty: Mercury

Our dependence on oil and coal-fired power plants has broad detrimental impacts on our health and our environment. Power plants represent America’s single biggest source of air pollution, affecting our waterways, destroying ecosystems, and polluting the air we breathe. Pollution from coal-fired power plants in particular contributes to four of the five leading causes of mortality in the United States: heart disease, cancer, stroke, and chronic respiratory diseases.

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